Effects of multielectrode renal denervation on elevated sympathetic nerve activity and insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

By 21 Ιανουαρίου 2017 10 Απριλίου, 2019 Δημοσιεύσεις

Δημοσίευση στις 2017/1/21 στο PubMed: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28106665

Tsioufis C, Dimitriadis K, Kasiakogias A, Kalos T, Liatakis I, Koutra E, Nikolopoulou L, Kordalis A, Ella RO, Lau EO, Grassi G, Papademetriou V, Tousoulis D.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to investigate the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on sympathetic nerve activity and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome.

METHODS:

Seventeen patients fulfilled at least four of five criteria for metabolic syndrome and under stable use of at least two antihypertensive drugs were randomized in 3 : 1 ratio to RDN (n = 13, 12 men, age: 58 ± 7 years) and control groups (n = 4, three men, age: 60 ± 5 years) and followed up for 3 months. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) at rest and during standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was assessed.

RESULTS:

In the RDN group, office and average 24-h blood pressures reduced by 16 ± 21/10 ± 11 mmHg (P = 0.01/0.007) and 14 ± 16/5 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.008/0.03) respectively; waist circumference reduced by 3.1 ± 3.6 cm (P = 0.008); and resting MSNA reduced from 55 ± 9 bursts per minute to 46 ± 8 bursts per minute (P = 0.0008) at month 3 post-RDN. During OGTT, although blunted MSNA responses were noted at baseline throughout the 120-min test, improved MSNA responses with burst frequency increased to 52 ± 8 bursts per minute (P < 0.001 vs. the resting MSNA, n = 13) at 30 min and to 54 ± 8 bursts per minute (P = 0.004 vs. the resting MSNA, n = 10) at 120 min and were observed at month 3 post-RDN. No such improvements were observed in the controls. No significant change was observed in the HOMA-IR in both groups at month 3.

CONCLUSION:

In this pilot study of patients with metabolic syndrome and associated hypertension, RDN reduced elevated sympathetic nerve activity and restored the normal neural response to oral glucose loading.

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